Coverage of The White House Gender Policy Council - 2021

Biden Resurrects Women’s Issues Office That Trump Disbanded

Scary Mommy.com, by Kristine Cannon, February 4, 2021

Trump disbanded an office focused on women’s issues; Biden’s bringing it back
It’s been — checks calendar — just over two weeks since President Joe Biden’s inauguration, and since, he’s made major waves in the White House — from overturning Trump’s ban on transgender people serving in the military to repealing one of Trump’s major anti-abortion policies (the “global gag rule”). Now, Biden’s resurrecting an office specifically focused on women’s issues — one that Trump disbanded shortly after taking office in 2017.

With gender equality clearly at the forefront of Biden’s administration’s policies, Biden created a new Gender Policy Council within the White House. It’s what NPR describes as a “reformulation of the Obama administration’s White House Council on Women and Girls.”

According to The Hill, the White House Gender Policy Council will be co-chaired by Jennifer Klein, chief strategy and policy officer at TIME’S UP, and Julissa Reynoso, the incoming assistant to the president and chief of staff to Dr. Jill Biden.<

“Major structural disruption requires major structural change,” Klein tells the outlet. “Thinking big right now is exactly what we need to do. So, now’s the time.”

According to the Biden-Harris transition team, the council will help “guide and coordinate government policy that impacts women and girls, across a wide range of issues such as economic security, health care, racial justice, gender-based violence, and foreign policy, working in cooperation with the other White House policy councils.”

In other words, the implementation of this council emphasizes a government-wide focus on advancing and protecting the rights of people of all genders in the U.S. and beyond.
The new council follows the release of a new analysis by the National Women’s Law Center that showed how women, especially those of color, were disproportionately hit in the job market amid the pandemic. The analysis also revealed that, in December alone, women lost 156,000 jobs while men gained 16,000 jobs.

Editor's Comment- FACT CHECK:

The Institute For Women's Policy Research (IWPR) states in their article:

Article titled "Wide Spread Decline in Household Income During COVID-19 Pandemic Contributes to Food Insufficiency Among Families" of August 20, 2020,

COVID-19 has had a devastating impact on the economic security and well-being of families. Since March, the economy has shed more than 13.3 million jobs – 55 percent of them lost by women – triggering widespread unemployment and sharp declines in household incomes. In mid-May 2020, almost 21 million people were unemployed. At 51.4 percent, women make up majority of those out of work or seeking employment—a historic first for the nation.

Gynocentric media, some of which is female supremacist, which only focuses on what females want to hear so they feel like victims, is damaging America. It is discrimination based on sex.

https://iwpr.org/iwpr-publications/briefing-paper/food-insufficiency-among-families/


The Harvard University School of Public Health study states "More men than women are dying of COVID-19. Why?" - released its US Gender/Sex COVID-19 Data Tracker, which offers the most comprehensive collection available of sex-separated COVID-19 statistics, and is publicly available.

"The data show that COVID-19 case and mortality rates for men and women vary widely among U.S. states. “In some states, the mortality rate among men is almost double the rate among women,” said Rushovich. “In other states, it’s almost equal. That suggests there’s probably other context—social factors, occupational exposures—that are influencing why the rates are varying between men and women, and that it’s not only related only to biological differences.”

“Too many women are struggling to make ends meet and support their families, and too many are lying awake at night worried about their children’s economic future,” Biden says in the announcement. “This was true before the COVID-19 pandemic, but the current global public health crisis has made these burdens infinitely heavier for women all over this country.”

Biden continues to say that the work of the council will be critical to “ensuring we build our nation back better by getting closer to equality for women and to the full inclusion of women in our economy and our society.”

Harris adds that all Americans deserve a fair shot to get ahead, “including women whose voices have not always been heard, and that the incoming administration will pursue a comprehensive plan to “open up opportunity and uphold the rights of women in our nation and around the world.”

“I look forward to working with these deeply knowledgeable and experienced public servants to address the challenges facing women and girls, and build a nation that is more equal and just,” Harris says.

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) applauded the new council, stating that they look forward to working with Klein and Pantaleón — and the larger women’s community — “to advance an agenda that will build women’s power and influence in society, accelerate the closing of the pay gap, strengthen our care infrastructure, protect and defend women’s reproductive freedom and autonomy, and help end sexual violence and harassment, among many other issues.”

“Under the Trump administration, we saw many of the gains made by women slip away or be challenged at the federal and state levels,” C. Nicole Mason, Ph.D., IWPR President and CEO, continues to say in the organization’s statement. “Given the disproportionate impact of the COVID-fueled recession on women, particularly on women of color, in partnership with the Council, we have an opportunity to create policies that reflect our values and that will create a more just and equitable society and world.”

With gender equality clearly at the forefront of Biden’s administration’s policies, Biden created a new Gender Policy Council within the White House. It’s what NPR describes as a “reformulation of the Obama administration’s White House Council on Women and Girls.”

According to The Hill, the White House Gender Policy Council will be co-chaired by Jennifer Klein, chief strategy and policy officer at TIME’S UP, and Julissa Reynoso, the incoming assistant to the president and chief of staff to Dr. Jill Biden.

“Major structural disruption requires major structural change,” Klein tells the outlet. “Thinking big right now is exactly what we need to do. So, now’s the time.”

According to the Biden-Harris transition team, the council will help “guide and coordinate government policy that impacts women and girls, across a wide range of issues such as economic security, health care, racial justice, gender-based violence, and foreign policy, working in cooperation with the other White House policy councils.”

In other words, the implementation of this council emphasizes a government-wide focus on advancing and protecting the rights of people of all genders in the U.S. and beyond.

The new council follows the release of a new analysis by the National Women’s Law Center that showed how women, especially those of color, were disproportionately hit in the job market amid the pandemic. The analysis also revealed that, in December alone, women lost 156,000 jobs while men gained 16,000 jobs.

“Too many women are struggling to make ends meet and support their families, and too many are lying awake at night worried about their children’s economic future,” Biden says in the announcement. “This was true before the COVID-19 pandemic, but the current global public health crisis has made these burdens infinitely heavier for women all over this country.”

Biden continues to say that the work of the council will be critical to “ensuring we build our nation back better by getting closer to equality for women and to the full inclusion of women in our economy and our society.”

Harris adds that all Americans deserve a fair shot to get ahead, “including women whose voices have not always been heard, and that the incoming administration will pursue a comprehensive plan to “open up opportunity and uphold the rights of women in our nation and around the world.”

“I look forward to working with these deeply knowledgeable and experienced public servants to address the challenges facing women and girls, and build a nation that is more equal and just,” Harris says.

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) applauded the new council, stating that they look forward to working with Klein and Pantaleón — and the larger women’s community — “to advance an agenda that will build women’s power and influence in society, accelerate the closing of the pay gap, strengthen our care infrastructure, protect and defend women’s reproductive freedom and autonomy, and help end sexual violence and harassment, among many other issues.”

“Under the Trump administration, we saw many of the gains made by women slip away or be challenged at the federal and state levels,” C. Nicole Mason, Ph.D., IWPR President and CEO, continues to say in the organization’s statement. “Given the disproportionate impact of the COVID-fueled recession on women, particularly on women of color, in partnership with the Council, we have an opportunity to create policies that reflect our values and that will create a more just and equitable society and world.”

USA Labor Statistics: Men Lost More Jobs from 2020 to 2021

But Men and Women Both Suffering During Pandemic Economy

Global Iniative For Boys and Men
Feb, 14, 2021

From January 2020 to January 2021, men lost 436,000 more jobs than women: men lost 2.3 million jobs and women lost 1.8 million jobs. The male unemployment rate (6.05%) was slighter higher than the female unemployment rate (5.95%) in January 2021. Over the course of a year, men's unemployment rose 2.9% (from 3.15% to 6.05%) and women's unemployment rose 2.73% (from 3.23% to 5.95%).

Male unemployment rose at higher numbers and rates than females (Table 1 & Table 2) in not-seasonally-adjusted and seasonally-adjusted unemployment numbers for men and women 16 and over and 20 and over. (Read Full Article and See GIBM Data-Graphics).

More men than women are dying from COVID-19. Why?

In Harvard’s GenderSci Lab, Harvard Chan School students and colleagues are gathering and analyzing data to try and find some answers

As COVID-19 has swept across the globe, it has killed many more men than women. Some have suggested that biological factors are driving the difference. But researchers at Harvard’s GenderSci Lab—including several students from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health—think that social factors may be playing the largest role.

The lab—which focuses on generating feminist concepts, methods, and theories for scientific research on sex and gender — includes gender scholars and biomedical scientists from Harvard and other universities. They’ve been gathering and analyzing data from across the U.S. to better understand gender disparities in COVID-19 cases and deaths, looking at factors including age, occupation, pre-existing conditions, behaviors, race and ethnicity, and living environment.

The data show that COVID-19 case and mortality rates for men and women vary widely among U.S. states. “In some states, the mortality rate among men is almost double the rate among women.”

The Boy Crisis Book - Warren Farrell - John Gray

The Boy Crisis Book

The Boy Crisis: Why Our Boys Are Struggling and What We Can Do About It

Authors- Waren Farrell PhD and John Gray PhD

What is the boy crisis?

It's a crisis of education. Worldwide, boys are 50 percent less likely than girls to meet basic proficiency in reading, math, and science.

It's a crisis of mental health. ADHD is on the rise. And as boys become young men, their suicide rates go from equal to girls to six times that of young women.

It's a crisis of fathering. Boys are growing up with less-involved fathers and are more likely to drop out of school, drink, do drugs, become delinquent, and end up in prison.

It's a crisis of purpose. Boys' old sense of purpose-being a warrior, a leader, or a sole breadwinner-are fading. Many bright boys are experiencing a "purpose void," feeling alienated, withdrawn, and addicted to immediate gratification.

So, what is The Boy Crisis? A comprehensive blueprint for what parents, teachers, and policymakers can do to help our sons become happier, healthier men, and fathers and leaders worthy of our respect.

Townhall

If Black Lives Matter, Black Dads Must Matter

Townhall, USA, Opinion, Dr. Warren Farrell, June 19, 2020

Loving African-American lives as much as we love the lives of others clearly includes addressing systemic racism. And it also means addressing the way America treats black men versus African-American women: African-American men are stopped by, shot by, and killed by police more than 20 times as frequently as African-American women. And the Bureau of Justice Statistics reports that African-American men are 25 times more likely to be imprisoned.

If disproportionately killing and imprisoning African-Americans is racist, then disproportionately killing and imprisoning males is sexist. But the real sexism is caring only about the systemic racism, and turning a blind eye to the other half of systemic: the sexism. The other half of "African-American male" is male.

Caring about Black boys and men quickly reveals there is no community that has been harder hit by dad-deprivation than the African-American community. It wasn’t always this way. Between 1880 and 1960, a majority of African-American families consisted of married fathers and mothers. But in the early sixties, nuclear families dramatically decreased. Inner city poverty and crime dramatically increased.

In 1965 sociologist Daniel Moynihan, who served under Presidents Nixon, Kennedy, and Johnson, led an investigation of inner-city life that concluded that the main predictor of growing up poor was not race per se but being born to parents who are not married. Why? A predictable outcome of no marriage was little or no father involvement.

While the Moynihan Report identified the quarter of black children born outside marriage as a crisis in 1965, the government’s counterproductive solution-giving moms money for not being married to dads-has contributed to almost a tripling of unmarried births among blacks (from 25 to 72 percent) and an expansion of the problem to white and Hispanic communities. The percentage of white children born outside marriage is now 36 percent-a nearly twelvefold increase from the 3.1 percent that it was in 1965.

Single moms have done an extraordinary job raising children even as they often raise money-and millions of their children have turned out well. But this rise of father absence often leaves single moms overwhelmed; dads depressed with neither purpose nor love; children more likely to be damaged in over 50 developmental areas; and pockets of fatherlessness that become pockets of crime.

As we’ve gone from the Era of Father Knows Best to Father Knows Less, Father’s Day is a perfect time to rediscover the value of dad. Fathers do not know less, they know differently. For example, Dad-style parenting is more likely to feature bonding by roughhousing, and stopping the roughhousing when rough gets too rough. And as dads engage the children in games, if his children don’t try hard enough or smart enough, he’ll teach them to be winners by letting them lose. The results are counterintuitive: Dad-enriched children demonstrate greater empathy, social skills, and postponed gratification.

Both Dad-deprived boys and girls suffer in fifty-plus areas of development, but a Dad-deprived boy is likely to suffer more intensely-by emotional withdrawal, depression, obesity, ADHD, imprisonment, and addiction to video games, porn, alcohol, drugs, and death by opioids.