Coverage of The White House Gender Policy Council - 2021

White House's New Gender Policy Council Excludes Boys and Men And sticks its head in the sand about some of our most serious problems

Erika Sanzi, Sanzi Says. March 3, 2021

Editor's Comments:

WOW! Were were impressed with Erika Sanzi. Here's her info:

Erika Sanzi
Erika Sanzi is a former educator and elected school committee member and the editor of this site, Project Forever Free. She is also a senior visiting fellow at the Thomas B. Fordham Institute. Her blog is Good School Hunting and her Substack is Sanzi Says. She occasionally writes for other outlets including Scary Mommy, The 74, and The Hill. She is the mother of three school aged sons and calls Rhode Island home.

About SanziSays: Thoughts on K12 education mostly but also culture, politics and Motherhood

There are currently seven federal offices of women's health in the United States.

There are zero federal offices of men’s health.

The Biden administration recently announced plans to form a “gender policy council” but there’s a catch—boys and men are excluded. Perhaps a better way to convey how bonkers this is to say that HALF the population will be left out, by design.

All of our sons, excluded.

All dads, excluded.

All gay men, excluded.

Even transgender men, excluded.

I am hard pressed to come up with any explanation for why a gender policy council, if it’s going to exist, would exclude all males.

The life expectancy of a man in the United States is five years shorter than for a woman.

81 percent of Americans between the ages of 10 and 24 who die by suicide in this country are male.

70 percent of people who die by opioid overdose are male.

Boys are the primary victims of community and gang violence and youth homicide and are more likely to be victims of fatal child abuse.


61 percent of All College Degrees go to to Females, 1966

Boys account for 80 percent of suspensions and expulsions in pre-school and 70 percent of suspensions and expulsions in K-12. These numbers are most disproportionate for black boys.

Two thirds of students in special education are male. Black boys are more likely than any other group to be placed in special education.


61 percent of All College Degrees go to to Females, 1966

Only 15 percent of black boys in 8th grade can read and write proficiently. That number is 42 percent for white 8th grade boys. Both numbers are sobering but the first one is a five-alarm fire.

Four times as many boys as girls are diagnosed with autism.

Boys are three times more likely to receive an ADHD diagnosis.

Boys earn 70 percent of Ds and Fs and drop out of high school at higher rates.

63 percent of Pell grants go to girls. That is $6.2 billion more in yearly funding for women than men in undergraduate programs.


61 percent of All College Degrees go to to Females, 1966

Over 90 percent of on-the-job deaths in this country happen to men.

Males account for 93 percent of our incarcerated population and the majority are there for a nonviolent crime. Males receive longer sentences than females for the exact same crime.

Men have also been dying from COVID at higher rates.

Remarkably, the White House does not seem to care about any of this. Or if they do care, they are too afraid of the political backlash they think will inevitably come if they broaden their focus to include boys and men. How sad is that?

Putting aside the cowardice it takes to be unwilling to admit, out loud, that boys and men also need and deserve support and investment, these trends are unsustainable. We do ourselves a huge disservice when we turn the complex realities facing males and females into some kind of contest. Humanity requires us to care about in word and deed. I am not saying that males should take the place of females on Biden’s gender policy council—I am simply requesting that they not be excluded.

Is that really too much to ask?


Source: https://sanzi.substack.com/p/white-houses-new-gender-policy-council


USA Labor Statistics: Men Lost More Jobs from 2020 to 2021

But Men and Women Both Suffering During Pandemic Economy

Global Iniative For Boys and Men
Feb, 14, 2021

From January 2020 to January 2021, men lost 436,000 more jobs than women: men lost 2.3 million jobs and women lost 1.8 million jobs. The male unemployment rate (6.05%) was slighter higher than the female unemployment rate (5.95%) in January 2021. Over the course of a year, men's unemployment rose 2.9% (from 3.15% to 6.05%) and women's unemployment rose 2.73% (from 3.23% to 5.95%).

Male unemployment rose at higher numbers and rates than females (Table 1 & Table 2) in not-seasonally-adjusted and seasonally-adjusted unemployment numbers for men and women 16 and over and 20 and over. (Read Full Article and See GIBM Data-Graphics).

More men than women are dying from COVID-19. Why?

In Harvard’s GenderSci Lab, Harvard Chan School students and colleagues are gathering and analyzing data to try and find some answers

As COVID-19 has swept across the globe, it has killed many more men than women. Some have suggested that biological factors are driving the difference. But researchers at Harvard’s GenderSci Lab—including several students from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health—think that social factors may be playing the largest role.

The lab—which focuses on generating feminist concepts, methods, and theories for scientific research on sex and gender — includes gender scholars and biomedical scientists from Harvard and other universities. They’ve been gathering and analyzing data from across the U.S. to better understand gender disparities in COVID-19 cases and deaths, looking at factors including age, occupation, pre-existing conditions, behaviors, race and ethnicity, and living environment.

The data show that COVID-19 case and mortality rates for men and women vary widely among U.S. states. “In some states, the mortality rate among men is almost double the rate among women.”

It's Tough to be a Boy in American Schools

It's a bad time to be a boy in America, Christina Sommers says in her important book, The War Against Boys. We are turning against boys, she writes. Boys need discipline, respect and moral guidance. They do not need to be pathologized. Sommer's book is packed with examples of the anti-male attitudes that pervade the public schools.

In my eldest daughter's pre-kindergarten class, run by parents in Greenwich Village, the children were from all sorts of ethnic and class backgrounds, but they always sorted themselves out by sex. The girls sat quietly at tables, drawing and talking. The boys all ran around screaming like maniacs, bouncing off the walls, raising so much ear-splitting commotion that my first reaction each day was a fleeting urge to strangle them all.

I do not believe that these male tots were acting out their assigned masculine gender roles in the patriarchical order. I think the obvious is true: Boys are different from girls. They like rough-and-tumble play. When they alight somewhere, they build something, then knock it down. They are not much interested in sitting quietly, talking about their feelings or working on relationships. They like action, preferably something involving noise, conflict and triumph.

Teachers know that girls are better suited to schooling. So if you want to teach boys, allowances must be made. One of the tragedies of the last 20 years or so is that school systems are increasingly unwilling to make those allowances. Instead, in the wake of the feminist movement, they have absorbed anti-male attitudes almost without controversy. They are now more likely to see ordinary boy behavior as something dangerous that must be reined in. Or they may tighten the screws on boys by drafting extraordinarily broad zero-tolerance and sexual-harassment policies. Worse, they may simply decide that the most active boys are suffering from attention deficit disorder and dope them up with Ritalin .

TEDx Dr Warren Farrell

TEDx - The Boy Crisis: Why Our Boys Are Struggling and What We Can Do About It

One of the foremost speakers and thinkers on gender issues

Dr. Warren Farrell

It's a crisis of education. Worldwide, boys are 50 percent less likely than girls to meet basic proficiency in reading, math, and science.

It's a crisis of mental health. ADHD is on the rise. And as boys become young men, their suicide rates go from equal to girls to six times that of young women.

It's a crisis of fathering. Boys are growing up with less-involved fathers and are more likely to drop out of school, drink, do drugs, become delinquent, and end up in prison.

It's a crisis of purpose. Boys' old sense of purpose-being a warrior, a leader, or a sole breadwinner-are fading. Many bright boys are experiencing a "purpose void," feeling alienated, withdrawn, and addicted to immediate gratification.

So, what is The Boy Crisis? A comprehensive blueprint for what parents, teachers, and policymakers can do to help our sons become happier, healthier men, and fathers and leaders worthy of our respect.

The Boy Crisis Book - Warren Farrell - John Gray

The Boy Crisis Book

The Boy Crisis: Why Our Boys Are Struggling and What We Can Do About It

Authors- Waren Farrell PhD and John Gray PhD

What is the boy crisis?

It's a crisis of education. Worldwide, boys are 50 percent less likely than girls to meet basic proficiency in reading, math, and science.

It's a crisis of mental health. ADHD is on the rise. And as boys become young men, their suicide rates go from equal to girls to six times that of young women.

It's a crisis of fathering. Boys are growing up with less-involved fathers and are more likely to drop out of school, drink, do drugs, become delinquent, and end up in prison.

It's a crisis of purpose. Boys' old sense of purpose-being a warrior, a leader, or a sole breadwinner-are fading. Many bright boys are experiencing a "purpose void," feeling alienated, withdrawn, and addicted to immediate gratification.

So, what is The Boy Crisis? A comprehensive blueprint for what parents, teachers, and policymakers can do to help our sons become happier, healthier men, and fathers and leaders worthy of our respect.